Research article

Carbon allocation, sequestration and carbon dioxide mitigation under plantation forests of north western Himalaya, India

Bandana Devi, D.R. Bhardwaj , Pankaj Panwar, Sharmistha Pal, N.K. Gupta, C.L. Thakur

Bandana Devi
University of Horticulture and Forestry, Himachal Pradesh 173230, India
D.R. Bhardwaj
University of Horticulture and Forestry, Himachal Pradesh 173230, India. Email: bhardwaj.uhf@gmail.com
Pankaj Panwar
Central Soil & Water Conservation Research & Training Institute, Research Centre, 160 019 Chandigarh, India.
Sharmistha Pal
Central Soil & Water Conservation Research & Training Institute, Research Centre, 160 019 Chandigarh, India.
N.K. Gupta
University of Horticulture and Forestry, Himachal Pradesh 173230, India
C.L. Thakur
University of Horticulture and Forestry, Himachal Pradesh 173230, India

Online First: July 06, 2012
Devi, B., Bhardwaj, D., Panwar, P., Pal, S., Gupta, N., Thakur, C. 2012. Carbon allocation, sequestration and carbon dioxide mitigation under plantation forests of north western Himalaya, India. Annals of Forest Research 56(1): 123-135.


The organic carbon and soils of the world comprise bulk of the terrestrial carbon and serve as amajorsink and source of atmospheric carbon. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of green house gases may be mitigated by increasing carbon sequestration in vegetation and soil. The study attempted to estimate biomass production and carbon sequestration potential of different plantation ecosystems in north western Himalaya, India. Biomass, carbon density of biomass, soil, detritus, carbon sequestration and CO2 mitigation potential were studied underdifferent plantation forest ecosystems comprising of eight different tree species viz. Quercus leucotrichophora, Pinus roxburghii), Acacia catechu, Acacia mollissima, Albizia procera, Alnus nitida, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Ulmus villosa. Above (185.57 ą 48.99 tha-1) and below ground (42.47 ą 10.38 tha-1 ) biomass was maximum in Ulmus villosa. The vegetation carbon density was maxium in Albizia procera (118.37 ą 1.49 tha-1) and minimum (36.50 ą 9.87 tha-1) in Acacia catechu. Soil carbon density was maximum (219.86ą 10.34 tha-1) in Alnus nitida, and minimum (170.83ą 20.60 tha-1)in Pinus roxburghii. Detritus was higher in Pinus roxburghii (6.79 ą 2.0 tha-1). Carbon sequestration (7.91ą 3.4 tha-1) and CO2 mitigation potential (29.09 ą 12.78 tha-1) was maximum in Ulmus villosa. Pearson correlation matrix revealed significant positive relationship of ecosystem carbon with plantation biomass, soil carbon and CO2 mitigation potential. With the emerging threat of climate change, such assessment of forest and soil carbon inventory would allow to devise best land management and policy decisions forsustainable management of fragile hilly ecosystem. 

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